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Island Life

A life like no other…

With 30 islanders calling the village their home, the Mount is a living, breathing community. Even before the first boats come and go from the harbour, the village springs to life – school children gathering to travel to the mainland, goods being loaded onto the quayside and islanders preparing for the jobs the day will bring.

Everyone who lives on the island plays their part. Boatman, mechanic, guide, gardener or fire officer – the islanders work together to keep everything running smoothly. 

The spirit of the island

As well as working together, the families that live here are friends, getting together to socialise, celebrate and make the most of their unique home. From around-the-island swims and beach barbecues in the summer, to bonfire night fireworks and Christmas parties for the kids, you can sense the island’s community spirit the moment you set foot on the quay.

In the hands of the tide

Yet for all its remote beauty, island life can throw up its challenges. Every day is dictated by weather and tides. And when the sea covers the causeway and stormy waves roll in, the mainland – with its shops, pubs and support – can feel far, far away. 

Liiving here day-to-day, learn more about the village and harbour’s rich history or plan your visit to experience life on the Mount for yourself.

Islanders today

Talk to those who grew up here and they’ll share stories of running the cobbled streets, swimming in the harbour, climbing the trees and riding to school in the back of a tractor in the ’87 storms. You’ll hear memories of how they watched moviemakers transform the island into Dracula’s lair for the 1979 film, or how someone fell in love with and married their island neighbour, before having children of their own. Whether planning a weekly shop or getting the children to school, it is a life planned around time and tide.

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Our island future

But what is it that lures people to this remote island life, where freezers are stocked with milk and bread in case of storms and kids secretly wish for black flag days when the boats can’t run, so they don’t get to school? It’s community. It’s the love of the place. It’s the knowledge that you’re all in it together. It’s looking around in the morning stillness, anticipating the visitors who are yet to arrive, and knowing you play a part in making the Mount a unique experience. 

They’re the stewards of the Mount’s traditions, preserving its past, present and future.